09 Sep '17, 8am

IBM To Launch Cryogenic Computer

So, 56 years ago, starts a story in Electronics Weekly’s edition of March 22nd 1961. The story continues: An executive of the firm’s Research Laboratory at Yorktown Heights, New York told a seminar on Solid-state devices at California Institute of Technology that IBM will have a few simple prototype computer systems using biased cryotrons with nanosecond operating times by that date. At the present time IBM has built loops and nanosecond time constants and small prototype memory; a simple subtractor circuit using unbiased crossed film cryotrons has also been built according to William B. Ittner. These have been built to provide verification for theories of operation as well as checkpoints for fabrication. IBM are working to obtain practicable and marketable cryogenic elements because of their inherently low power levels, potentiallow cost and high reliability, Mr. Ittncr s...

Full article: https://www.electronicsweekly.com/blogs/mannerisms/memory...

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