13 Jan '18, 3am

DLP(マイクロミラーデバイス)、IEEE Spectrumの特集記事『チップの殿堂』でCPUに混じって堂々の殿堂入りしていたけど、本当に世界を変えた/変えつつある https://t.co/o6fdph61rf

On 18 June 1999, Larry Hornbeck took his wife, Laura, on a date. They went to watch Star Wars: Episode 1—The Phantom Menace at a theater in Burbank, Calif. Not that the graying engineer was an avid Jedi fan. The reason they were there was actually the projector. At the heart of the projector was a chip—the digital micromirror device—that Hornbeck had invented at Texas Instruments . A DMD uses millions of hinged microscopic mirrors to direct light through a projection lens. The Phantom Menace screening was “the first digital exhibition of a major motion picture,” says Hornbeck, a TI Fellow. Today movie projectors based on this digital light-processing technology—or DLP, as TI branded it—are used in thousands of theaters. It’s also integral to rear-projection TVs, office projectors, and tiny projectors for cellphones. “To paraphrase Houdini,” Hornbeck says, “micromirrors, ge...

Full article: https://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-history/silicon-revolution...

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