29 Oct '13, 5pm

Toyota's killer firmware:

It all starts with the engineering culture. If you have to fight to implement quality, or conversely, if others let you get away with shoddy work, quality cannot flourish. The culture must support proper peer review, documented rule enforcement, use of code-quality tools and metrics, etc. In complex systems, it's impossible to test all potential hardware- and software-induced failure scenarios. We must strive to implement all possible best practices, and use all the tools at our disposal, to create code that is failure-resistant by design . Use model-based design where suitable. Use tools with the proper credentials, not an uncertified RTOS as was done here. The system must undergo thorough testing by a separate engineering team. Never make the mistake of testing your own design. (To be true, Toyota's overall test strategy was not specifically described.) The underlying ha...

Full article: http://www.edn.com/design/automotive/4423428/2/Toyota-s-k...

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