31 Dec '16, 5pm

The world's smallest radio receiver has some big implications for the scientific community.

The world's smallest radio receiver has some big implications for the scientific community.

As anyone who works with technology should know, size doesn’t matter — at least not the way we usually think. From the smallest and most minuscule of devices can come enormous power and potential. And scientists have once again proven this to be true by designing the world’s smallest radio receiver , a creation of truly tiny proportions. A team of scientists from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has successfully designed the smallest radio receiver in the world. ‘Small’ doesn’t really accurately convey the dimensions these scientists worked with: the building blocks of the receiver are the size of two atoms , and the whole thing was constructed from atomic-scale defects in pink diamonds. Although it’s remarkably small in dimensions, this radio receiver is made of tough stuff. It can withstand harsh environments with no compromise of it...

Full article: http://incompliancemag.com/worlds-smallest-radio-receiver/

Tweets

Plan to save the near-extinct vaquita porpoise could have a disastrous outcome:

Plan to save the near-extinct vaquita porpoise ...

care2.com 31 Dec '16, 3pm

The world’s smallest and rarest porpoise is only years away from disappearing forever, but a new plan launched to save the...

DARPA radio transmitter to revolutionize battle...

militarytimes.com 29 Dec '16, 7pm

Military engineers are looking to revolutionize battlefield communications by introducing a new project that seeks to brid...

Parts Bin Bonanza Leads to Arduino FM Radio

Parts Bin Bonanza Leads to Arduino FM Radio

hackaday.com 29 Dec '16, 4pm

Trolling eBay for parts can be bad for your wallet and your parts bin. Yes, it’s nice to be well stocked, but eventually y...

Check out a new way to listen to world radio. T...

hackaday.com 04 Jan '17, 1pm

There was a time when electronic hackers (or hobbyist, enthusiasts, geeks, or whatever you want to be called) were better ...