30 Mar '12, 6pm

We have a name for organisms that embed themselves into insects to control their motions: parasites.

PHOTO: Boyce Thompson Institute Take a moth during its pupal stage. Insert electrodes and a control chip into it. Wait a few days. The result? An unmanned aerial vehicle, of course! Turning moths (or pigeons, rats, beetles, bees, and sharks, for that matter) into remote controlled cyborg critters has long been a goal of mad scientists and DARPA program managers. Spectrum's Sally Adee reports on the latest initiatives of DARPA's HI-MEMS, or Hybrid Insect Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems project. (I guess the name says it all.) According to Adee, researchers at the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, in Ithaca, N.Y. -- one of the contractors on the HI-MEMS project -- are making progress toward their goal of growing MEMS-insect hybrids. In a paper presented at IEEE MEMS 2009, Adee writes, they describe "silicon neural interfaces for gas sensors that were inserted int...

Full article: http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/robotics-soft...

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@LandrasGembar Check this out

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spectrum.ieee.org 26 Mar '12, 4pm

10 December 2009—This week at the International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), in Baltimore, Md., Cornell University eng...

MEMS Switches for Low-Power Logic

MEMS Switches for Low-Power Logic

spectrum.ieee.org 30 Mar '12, 7pm

Images: Top: Rhesa Nathanael/UC Berkeley; Bottom: SEMATECH Mechanical Logic: This six-terminal relay [bottom], which boast...