30 Mar '17, 7pm

Smell, the Glove

By printing sensor circuits on boring old disposable rubber gloves, researchers have converted them into handy, low-cost screening tools for chemical threats and toxic pollutants. That means someday, security agents might swipe their gloved fingertip on a bag and quickly get an alert for traces of nerve agents and explosives on their smartphone. The glove sensors , printed with special stretchable conductive inks , can detect a class of phosphorus-based chemical compounds used as chemical weapons and pesticides. In addition to weapons screening, the new lab-on-a-glove could be useful for food safety and environmental inspections, says Joseph Wang , a nanoengineer at the University of California, San Diego who developed the device reported in the journal ACS Sensors . The military today has portable test kits to detect nerve agent vapors and liquids, including VX, which is ...

Full article: http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/biomedical/diagnostics...

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